J.J. Dadaists to possess anti-authority values leading its

J.J. Alejos

Louisa Benhissen

Art – 06

10 December 2017

Thesis/Research Paper Art History – Dada Movement

            Dada was shaped by artists spanning from Europe and America in the 1920s and ’30s, they showcased themselves as anti-artists, challenging what would be conformist regulations and rejected powerfully the inhumanities of World War 1. To get a further analysis of their contemporary feelings Dadaists were disgusted at the war of 1914 to 1918 and so as a reaction they sought to utilize the art medium in all its variety in order to reject aesthetic gratification but rather to incite reactions instead. Dada originated in response to the bloodshed that globally pits soldier against soldier, all for the sake of power led by corrupt groups of leaders, thus leading to what is known as Dada stemming from the roots of being a wartime movement reaction. Because of this, it led many Dadaists to possess anti-authority values leading its contributors in not having a single figure to take the position of one main person in charge. The First World War consequentially delayed the recognition of contemporary machinery. Postwar, artist sentiments fixated on machines viewed them as humanitarian and benevolent. However, Dada’s change in direction in terms of creating art was distant which then could be related to the method in which impersonal machinery was arbitrarily slaughtering these soldiers. The outcome of soldiers and the populace was therefore determined by Possibility and unpredictability. Therefore their fate was in the hands of the artistic disagreement involving past world philosophy of bravery and the emerging promises of machinery. As a result, this shaped the practices of Dada in terms of their rebelliousness and frustration concerning the artists and their outlook on the War.

            The approach of art that Dada took in terms of style and the like created commotion for those contemporaries that did not particularly appreciate the mockery that Dada-esque projects appealed to. Many people claim that if it were not for the collective of the artists that were part of the  Dada movement what we call modern art would not have existed. This movement later inspires another movement called Surrealism. The influence that Dada gave is important because it helped pave the way of abstract art and other forms of art because of the uncanny  approach of its innovative personality. This encouragement helped many up and coming artists to create montages and collages we call today because of their efforts. One prolific artist Hanna Hoch and her collages are very interesting to say the least like for example, her piece “Cut with the Kitchen Knife”.

 Image Above, “I wish to blur the firm boundaries which we self-certain people tend to delineate around all we can achieve,”  – Hannah Hoch

She was viewed inferior at the time because she was a woman, and yet that didn’t stop her at all she was a strong woman that was considered by many a feminist. Hoch’s hallmark in many of her pieces critiqued society’s approach regarding women, and she also presented her works of femininity in a clichéd fashion. By meticulously gathering bits and pieces from other mediums unrelated to make something new and interesting was unheard of at the time. Her influence in terms of collage later led many other artists to participate in and was thus implemented by Dadaists and Surrealists later down the road as a means of art.          

            Another Dada artist of great significance is Marcel Duchamp he coined  the notion of the “ready-made,” by means of  transforming day-to-day non-art considered objects into fabrics of art. One such example is his famous work called “Fountain”.

  Image Above, “You have to approach something with indifference, as if you had no aesthetic emotion. The choice of readymades is always based on visual indifference and, at the same time, on the total absence of good or bad taste.” – Marcel Duchamp

 

These mass produced works of art had been discarded by the general public because some viewed such work pieces as immoral at the time. Thus Duchamp’s work of art pushed the boundaries and questioned what one would consider an art piece. His original intention in terms of why he decided to make such a piece was as a response to mocking those American avant-garde art projects. Little did he know that his art work would later end up establishing to be measured as a very influential art piece of the century.

            The Dada movement also helped create a subdivision of collage into what is called photomontage. Max Ernest another Dadaist was a exceedingly experimental artist that became to be a pioneer of this respective movement and Surrealism that followed.  He  unfortunately was forced into the military as a soldier of the first world war and the aftermath left the man disturbed because of the consequences of going into a war. This led him to be incredibly critical in terms of his perspective of western society. As a result of this it fueled his sentiment and idea that humanity is unreasonable. Early on in his art endeavor he pursued collages and his other art pursuits helped pave the road for him to be able to mend his trauma and individual concerns by means of being able to produce art that filled his notion of the fantastical.     One such piece is his photomontage work called, “Santa Conversazione”.

Image above, ” Art has nothing to do with taste. Art is not there to be tasted.'”  – Max Ernst

            In conclusion, there was and is much to learn from these Dada artists. With the rejection of contemporary considered norms of the period created odd, yet a satisfying movement of eccentric artists and their work. Their contributions to the realm of  fine art shook the world with their pieces and pushed buttons that people were just not ready for. The wacky nature of these artists and creativity behind it really exemplifies the idea that through sheer effort to stand out or not there is an audience that will eventually pay an interest. Some other great Dada artists that immensely contributed to the this movement involve Salvador Dali and Man Ray. Salvador  himself also like many of the movement sought to provoke with his work pieces. Man Ray contributed his Dada style of photography who with help of Marcel Duchamp co-founded an American branch of which was part of their movement. Dada really reveled under the idea of unpredictability that took form in absurdity. This helped to create further movements like Surrealism and pop-art all through the efforts and impact that these artists gave to the world. Their collective idea that anything is possible in terms of art is fantastic. That the very fabric of the idea making process is more significant than even the work itself! It was indeed a very interesting to say the least movement that turned the world upside down with what they had contributed with the rest of the world.

 

Works Cited

 “Dada and Dadaism : History of the Dada Movement.” Dada and Dadaism : History of the Dada Movement, www.dadart.com/dadaism/dada/020-history-dada-movement.html.

“Dada Movement, Artists and Major Works.” The Art Story, The Art Story Contributors, www.theartstory.org/movement-dada.htm.

 

Word Count –

 

 

J.J. Alejos

Louisa Benhissen

Art – 06

10 December 2017

Thesis/Research Paper Art History – Dada Movement

            Dada was shaped by artists spanning from Europe and America in the 1920s and ’30s, they showcased themselves as anti-artists, challenging what would be conformist regulations and rejected powerfully the inhumanities of World War 1. To get a further analysis of their contemporary feelings Dadaists were disgusted at the war of 1914 to 1918 and so as a reaction they sought to utilize the art medium in all its variety in order to reject aesthetic gratification but rather to incite reactions instead. Dada originated in response to the bloodshed that globally pits soldier against soldier, all for the sake of power led by corrupt groups of leaders, thus leading to what is known as Dada stemming from the roots of being a wartime movement reaction. Because of this, it led many Dadaists to possess anti-authority values leading its contributors in not having a single figure to take the position of one main person in charge. The First World War consequentially delayed the recognition of contemporary machinery. Postwar, artist sentiments fixated on machines viewed them as humanitarian and benevolent. However, Dada’s change in direction in terms of creating art was distant which then could be related to the method in which impersonal machinery was arbitrarily slaughtering these soldiers. The outcome of soldiers and the populace was therefore determined by Possibility and unpredictability. Therefore their fate was in the hands of the artistic disagreement involving past world philosophy of bravery and the emerging promises of machinery. As a result, this shaped the practices of Dada in terms of their rebelliousness and frustration concerning the artists and their outlook on the War.

            The approach of art that Dada took in terms of style and the like created commotion for those contemporaries that did not particularly appreciate the mockery that Dada-esque projects appealed to. Many people claim that if it were not for the collective of the artists that were part of the  Dada movement what we call modern art would not have existed. This movement later inspires another movement called Surrealism. The influence that Dada gave is important because it helped pave the way of abstract art and other forms of art because of the uncanny  approach of its innovative personality. This encouragement helped many up and coming artists to create montages and collages we call today because of their efforts. One prolific artist Hanna Hoch and her collages are very interesting to say the least like for example, her piece “Cut with the Kitchen Knife”.

 Image Above, “I wish to blur the firm boundaries which we self-certain people tend to delineate around all we can achieve,”  – Hannah Hoch

She was viewed inferior at the time because she was a woman, and yet that didn’t stop her at all she was a strong woman that was considered by many a feminist. Hoch’s hallmark in many of her pieces critiqued society’s approach regarding women, and she also presented her works of femininity in a clichéd fashion. By meticulously gathering bits and pieces from other mediums unrelated to make something new and interesting was unheard of at the time. Her influence in terms of collage later led many other artists to participate in and was thus implemented by Dadaists and Surrealists later down the road as a means of art.          

            Another Dada artist of great significance is Marcel Duchamp he coined  the notion of the “ready-made,” by means of  transforming day-to-day non-art considered objects into fabrics of art. One such example is his famous work called “Fountain”.

  Image Above, “You have to approach something with indifference, as if you had no aesthetic emotion. The choice of readymades is always based on visual indifference and, at the same time, on the total absence of good or bad taste.” – Marcel Duchamp

 

These mass produced works of art had been discarded by the general public because some viewed such work pieces as immoral at the time. Thus Duchamp’s work of art pushed the boundaries and questioned what one would consider an art piece. His original intention in terms of why he decided to make such a piece was as a response to mocking those American avant-garde art projects. Little did he know that his art work would later end up establishing to be measured as a very influential art piece of the century.

            The Dada movement also helped create a subdivision of collage into what is called photomontage. Max Ernest another Dadaist was a exceedingly experimental artist that became to be a pioneer of this respective movement and Surrealism that followed.  He  unfortunately was forced into the military as a soldier of the first world war and the aftermath left the man disturbed because of the consequences of going into a war. This led him to be incredibly critical in terms of his perspective of western society. As a result of this it fueled his sentiment and idea that humanity is unreasonable. Early on in his art endeavor he pursued collages and his other art pursuits helped pave the road for him to be able to mend his trauma and individual concerns by means of being able to produce art that filled his notion of the fantastical.     One such piece is his photomontage work called, “Santa Conversazione”.

Image above, ” Art has nothing to do with taste. Art is not there to be tasted.'”  – Max Ernst

            In conclusion, there was and is much to learn from these Dada artists. With the rejection of contemporary considered norms of the period created odd, yet a satisfying movement of eccentric artists and their work. Their contributions to the realm of  fine art shook the world with their pieces and pushed buttons that people were just not ready for. The wacky nature of these artists and creativity behind it really exemplifies the idea that through sheer effort to stand out or not there is an audience that will eventually pay an interest. Some other great Dada artists that immensely contributed to the this movement involve Salvador Dali and Man Ray. Salvador  himself also like many of the movement sought to provoke with his work pieces. Man Ray contributed his Dada style of photography who with help of Marcel Duchamp co-founded an American branch of which was part of their movement. Dada really reveled under the idea of unpredictability that took form in absurdity. This helped to create further movements like Surrealism and pop-art all through the efforts and impact that these artists gave to the world. Their collective idea that anything is possible in terms of art is fantastic. That the very fabric of the idea making process is more significant than even the work itself! It was indeed a very interesting to say the least movement that turned the world upside down with what they had contributed with the rest of the world.

 

Works Cited

 “Dada and Dadaism : History of the Dada Movement.” Dada and Dadaism : History of the Dada Movement, www.dadart.com/dadaism/dada/020-history-dada-movement.html.

“Dada Movement, Artists and Major Works.” The Art Story, The Art Story Contributors, www.theartstory.org/movement-dada.htm.

 

Word Count –

 

 

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